“I recently saw a Charlie Rose interview with John Lasseter, a founder of Pixar, about the creative process behind his movies. Pixar’s in-house theory is: Be wrong as fast as you can. Mistakes are an inevitable part of the creative process, so get right down to it and start making them. Even great ideas are wrecked on the road to fruition and then have to be painstakingly reconstructed. “Every Pixar film was the worst motion picture ever made at one time or another,” Lasseter said. “People don’t believe that, but it’s true. But we don’t give up on the films.””

it’s the little things!

littlebigdetails:

Harvest - When you leave a tab open on today’s timesheet and return to that tab the next day, it warns you that it’s a new day and provides a link to the new timesheet.

/via Mark van Lent

Art and music intersect as Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Anthony Kiedis and artist Ed Ruscha talk language, creativity and the magic of Los Angeles.

The design team is hard at work on user experience flows. Brightly colored post-its to cheer up this grey rainy day in New York City!

Steps for creating an amazing habit:

  1. Start so small you “can’t fail” (more on the reality of that later)
  2. Work on the small habit for as long as it becomes a ritual (something you’re pulled towards rather than which requires willpower)
  3. Make a very small addition to the habit, ideally anchored to an existing ritual

Great quote from Tom Sachs, a contemporary artist who has a surprising take on how to get creative people to work together and get stuff done. 

‘[S]ent does not mean received’ is a profound thing. Half of your job in this studio is doing your work, the other half of your job is communicating that it’s been done. Because if you do it, and I don’t hear about it, how do I know what’s going on? I’m not trying to control everything, but in an intimate work environment, where we’re really trying to develop something complex, a nod, saying, ‘I got it,’ helps moves things along.

“The president prefers to have “decision” memos delivered to him with three checkboxes at the bottom that read: agree, disagree, or “let’s discuss.””
— Limit decision fatigue: In early 2012, The New Yorker’s Ryan Lizza obtained hundreds of pages of White House memos that offered an intimate look into the inner-workings of President Barak Obama’s team. 
So great: “Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.”

In 1932-1933, while working on what would become his first published novel, Tropic of Cancer, Miller devised and adhered to a stringent daily routine to propel his writing. Among it was this list of eleven commandments, found in Henry Miller on Writing.
So great: “Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.”

In 1932-1933, while working on what would become his first published novel, Tropic of Cancer, Miller devised and adhered to a stringent daily routine to propel his writing. Among it was this list of eleven commandments, found in Henry Miller on Writing.

So great: “Work calmly, joyously, recklessly on whatever is in hand.”

In 1932-1933, while working on what would become his first published novel, Tropic of Cancer, Miller devised and adhered to a stringent daily routine to propel his writing. Among it was this list of eleven commandments, found in Henry Miller on Writing.

Paul is hard at work: Snow Leopard, Windows XP, Mountain Lion, Mountain Lion, Mountain Lion, Lion.

How To Create Time:

1. Eliminate or reduce media

2. Work offline.

3. Do less.

4. Don’t make appointments or schedule meetings.

5. Sleep in two shifts.

6. Make time less precious.

Read the full tips from Caterina Fake, not just on how to create time, but how to work with joy. (via idonethis)

(via idonethis)

“Write with the door closed, rewrite with the door open.”
— Advice on (when not to take) advice, from Stephen King. While feedback and input are a critical form of advice, they too can warp our own ideals.

another great find by idonethis:

The schedules of some pretty productive people. (via idlethink)

(via idonethis)

45royaleblog:

For those of you that use Harvest for invoicing and time-tracking, it looks like there will be new updates to Harvest’s Timesheet going live next week. You can check out a quick demo video above or check out their blog for a breakdown of everything in the new release.

Thanks for the shout out — we’re excited to get this out to everyone next week!